Rowan Gillam, a boy from Brisbane, goes blind after a horrific motorcycle accident in Brisbane

A young boy has been left completely blind after being thrown 15 meters from his motorbike in a horrific crash that nearly cost him his life.

Jill and John Gillam outfitted their seven-year-old son, Rowan, in full safety gear for his first motocross race in Brisbane in 2020.

But tragedy struck when Rowan, the first of 20 riders to start, lost control around a bend on the Fort Lytton Motocross Club track and was found motionless in a dry creek bed.

The injuries were so severe that Rowan had to have part of his skull removed to reduce pressure on his brain, with the seven-year-old spending almost two weeks in a coma.

Rowan, now nine, also suffered a stroke, with the injuries leading to his loss of sight.

Although Rowan’s life was forever changed, his parents said he took it all in his stride – and even intended to compete in the Paralympic Games.

An Australian mum has opened up about the sickening motorbike accident that left her seven-year-old son blind – and shared that his miraculous recovery stunned everyone around him

Rowan Gillam's mum and dad Jill and John are stunned by their son's remarkable recovery from heartbreaking crash and long recovery

Rowan Gillam’s mum and dad Jill and John are stunned by their son’s remarkable recovery from heartbreaking crash and long recovery

Rowan's motocross accident left him in critical condition at Queensland Children's Hospital

Rowan’s motocross accident left him in critical condition at Queensland Children’s Hospital

Rowan had to have part of his skull removed to reduce pressure on his brain, with the seven-year-old spending nearly two weeks in a coma

Rowan had to have part of his skull removed to reduce pressure on his brain, with the seven-year-old spending nearly two weeks in a coma

Looking back on the terrifying accident, Ms Gillam recalled seeing the crowd rushing towards a runner, unaware that it was Rowan.

“I ran when I saw other men running I thought ‘that’s a bit strange, I can’t see Rowan, I can’t see him rolling,’ Ms Gillam told The Daily MailAustralia.

“He was unconscious, cold.”

Frantic onlookers called for an ambulance as her panicked parents watched in horror as Rowan rushed to Queensland Children’s Hospital.

Rowan was in a coma for 10 days after the accident

It took him a month to fully emerge from his coma

Rowan was in a coma for 10 days and it took him a month to come out of the coma completely

Tragically, the swelling blocked the blood supply to the part of his brain that controls vision - the occipital lobes - and he was left totally blind.

Tragically, the swelling blocked the blood supply to the part of his brain that controls vision – the occipital lobes – and he was left totally blind.

“Rowan had all the safety gear we could, we spent $500 on the best helmet, it was like a treat – he’s brand new before the race, helmet, elbow pads, knee pads, neck protection” , Ms. Gillam said.

His bike was checked and found to be faultless, and Rowan had hiked the trail twice a week with his dad since he was five years old.

Rowan was placed in a coma while still inside the ambulance after paramedics realized the boy had swelling in his brain.

When he was finally able to start talking again, Rowan told his parents he couldn't watch TV.

When he was finally able to start talking again, Rowan told his parents he couldn’t watch TV.

Rowan had to undergo occupational therapy to learn to walk again

Rowan had to undergo occupational therapy to learn to walk again

For the next few days, a machine measured the pressure in her brain and “it didn’t look good,” her mother said.

“The pressure just kept going up and up and up. Then it got higher and that’s when he had a stroke,’ Ms Gillam said.

Rowan also suffered from a staph infection in his brain because he needed part of his skull removed to release pressure.

For seven terrifying days, the Gilliams thought their boy might die.

It took him a month to fully emerge from the coma and while his broken parents waited they were told he could wake up as a ‘vegetable, unable to eat or go blind’.

When he was finally able to start talking again, Roman told his parents he couldn’t watch TV.

Rowan quickly showed interest in playing football using a special ball with a bell inside

Rowan quickly showed interest in playing football using a special ball with a bell inside

Rowan began to improve when the Starlight Foundation helped him get music therapy

Rowan began to improve when the Starlight Foundation helped him get music therapy

Tragically, the swelling blocked the blood supply to the part of his brain that controls vision – the occipital lobes – and he was left totally blind.

Rowan slowly began to improve through music therapy run by the Starlight Foundation.

Slowly he got out of bed and danced holding his mother’s hand. Her favorite song was “Baby” by Justin Bieber.

Soon, Rowan was “laughing and joking”, returning to his old self.

“It was remarkable,” Ms Gilliam said.

Rowan wanted to be active despite having to wear a helmet that protected his brain. He eventually had a prosthesis implanted where part of his skull had been removed.

The seven-year-old was even kicking footballs with the rehab team – despite having no vision at all.

Soon Rowan

Soon Rowan was ‘laughing and joking, it was remarkable’, Ms Gillam said

He wore a helmet to protect his brain, exposed just under the skin after part of his skull was removed, for a year, but that didn't stop him from developing a love for the gym.

He wore a helmet to protect his brain, exposed just under the skin after part of his skull was removed, for a year, but that didn’t stop him from developing a love for the gym.

Rowan, now nine, has refused to let his injuries define his life and loves to exercise.

“He’s had this new lease on life, he’s doing a lot of things he might not have done before,” Ms Gillam said.

“He loves to dance and has lost all his inhibitions. He says “Come on mom look at me!”

“His memory is very good too – he loves learning French and speaks to us in French. He learned Braille in a year and goes to the gym twice a week.

Rowan also plays football with the ball containing a bell so he knows where he is.

He is determined to become a Paralympian one day.

“He is very very adorable, also thinks of others and loves other children,” Ms Gillam said.

“Some people might come out of an experience like he’s really angry, but he’s not, he’s really happy and positive, like a perfect kid.”

Mrs Gillam describes her son as a

Rowan is popular with other children and makes friends easily.

“Some people might come out of an experience like he’s really angry, but he’s not, he’s really happy and positive, like a perfect child,” Ms Gillam said.

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