Aegis Rider: Prototype goggles teach motorcyclists how to lean into a corner


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Let’s face it; in a perfect world everyone would figure out how to descend and lean in a curve (we might also have cheaper ARCH motorcycles and a surplus of racing tracks available to hit top speeds for free, but i digress from subject).

Unfortunately, the motorcycling community is full of new (and experienced) riders who haven’t figured out where to look on an incline yet – and the results can be dangerous when they take a turn faster than they can, no matter what. the type of bike they are on.

With this in mind, an advanced motorcycle safety system being developed (called Aegis rider) has developed a set of unique glasses that allow the rider to see their path – both where they are supposed to be on the curve, as well as how much to lean and where to look when exiting that turn.

A view of the Aegis Rider Ride Enhancement Goggles currently in beta testing

The report of Visor Bottom states that the software works from “a system of cameras, machine learning and map processing … the system displays information via a heads-up display using augmented reality glasses, with the aim of rendering the safer motorcycle for drivers ”.

A view of the Aegis Rider Ride Enhancement Goggles currently in beta testing

Imagine this. It’s a sunny day, you’ve put on your sunglasses and you’re approaching a particularly annoying curve. Your shades snap into place, the HUD (heads-up display) projects a visible line along the road you are looking at to suggest the optimum line (and tilt) to take.

As you approach that bend, the system “monitors for dangerous maneuvers in bends or tight bends, the incorrect speed for an upcoming bend, or dangers on the road”.

A view of the Aegis Rider Ride Enhancement Goggles currently in beta testing

Sounds smart, although the question to ask is no longer “how safe can I be”, but “what safety aid should I use before it starts to make matters worse”?

VisorDown hit the nail on the head here. What happens if the machine does not detect a danger / problem on the road or if you are driving in the dark? How confident can you be of the information provided? We all know people who are too dependent on equipment to protect them while on the road, and there will certainly be a temptation to do the same with this software.

A view of the Aegis Rider Ride Enhancement Goggles currently in beta testing

The report says the company is still in the testing phase of the program, so nothing is set in stone; However, for a concept tempting to help cyclists acquire the most basic skills related to riding, I could see this program as a useful learning tool – a way to at least develop the confidence of new riders. in courses for beginners.

A view of a beginner rider learning to lean

Want to test the software? The company is actively looking for participants willing to try the Aegis Rider. Register as a test pilot on their website if you are interested; in the meantime, be sure to read the other motorcycle safety articles we’ve picked from our archives for you, and as always, stay careful around the corners.

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About Todd Wurtsbach

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